Home Networking Sydney Airport launches real-time flight information service for passengers

Sydney Airport launches real-time flight information service for passengers

Want to know if your flight is on time, or when your friends and family are expected to land? Sydney Airport now connects you to this info directly via Twitter.

Sydney Airport (SYD) has launched a new service offering tailored, real-time flight information via social media, stating this move is designed to further enhance the customer experience and is a demonstration of its commitment to leverage technology to achieve this.

The airport has signed up with software provider TIC's BizTweet platform. Now anyone flying to or from Sydney Airport can keep up-to-date with flight information by simply tweeting their flight number to @flySYD, or by visiting the flight information menu from the Sydney Airport website.

Managing director and chief executive Kerrie Mather said, "we want to make the airport experience as simple and stress-free as possible for the 42 million passengers who fly in and out of Sydney Airport on more than 300,000 flights every year.

"We’re proud to engage with our passengers through this information service, which provides access to the latest details on international and domestic flights, departure gates and boarding times at the touch of a button.

"Importantly, passengers will be able to access personalised flight information in their native language, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so they’ll receive timely and relevant information, when and where they need it."

Sydney Airport expects this new system to not only provide helpful information, but improve passenger flow through the airport's terminals and thereby improve efficiency in general.

TIC founder and chief executive Paul Brugger said, "Sydney Airport is one of the most well-known airports in the whole world and we are now able to offer our tailored solution to more people than ever before, further enhancing the airport’s service to its passengers."

"It’s great to see Sydney making their service as relevant as possible to the passenger by using our multi-lingual functionality to communicate in up to 41 different languages instantly."

The introduction of this new service builds on Sydney Airport’s technology strategy, which is delivering new and more customised ways for visitors and passengers to access the information they need when planning their trip to the airport.

Sydney Airport has implemented a suite of state-of-the-art technology, including free Wi-Fi and airport apps, self-service check-in, automated bag drops, SmartGates, dynamic wayfinding e-directories and beacon technology.

New multilingual Flight Information Displays (FIDS) are also available in 13 languages at the T1 International terminal. The new look FIDS feature bolder colours, larger font and a more intuitive display to enhance readability and wayfinding for passengers.

Sydney is Australia’s leading airport for social media followers, with about 160,000 followers across Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn and offers the BizTweet service in 41 languages, from Arabic through to Vietnamese.

LEARN HOW TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MVNO

Did you know: 1 in 10 mobile services in Australia use an MVNO, as more consumers are turning away from the big 3 providers?

The Australian mobile landscape is changing, and you can take advantage of it.

Any business can grow its brand (and revenue) by adding mobile services to their product range.

From telcos to supermarkets, see who’s found success and learn how they did it in the free report ‘Rise of the MVNOs’.

This free report shows you how to become a successful MVNO:

· Track recent MVNO market trends
· See who’s found success with mobile
· Find out the secret to how they did it
· Learn how to launch your own MVNO service

DOWNLOAD NOW!

David M Williams

joomla site stats

David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. Within two years, he returned to his alma mater, the University of Newcastle, as a UNIX systems manager. This was a crucial time for UNIX at the University with the advent of the World-Wide-Web and the decline of VMS. David moved on to a brief stint in consulting, before returning to the University as IT Manager in 1998. In 2001, he joined an international software company as Asia-Pacific troubleshooter, specialising in AIX, HP/UX, Solaris and database systems. Settling down in Newcastle, David then found niche roles delivering hard-core tech to the recruitment industry and presently is the Chief Information Officer for a national resources company where he particularly specialises in mergers and acquisitions and enterprise applications.