Tuesday, 25 February 2020 22:46

Smartphones dominate the ‘digital experience’ research reveals Featured

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Australian consumers have traditionally been early adopters of new technologies and at the end of 2019 several key milestones were reached, according to research firm Telsyte which reveals that smartphones have now become the main digital device for more than half (51%) of Australians - with millions of Australians loyal to either their iPhones or Android smartphones.

Telsyte says this is driving an unprecedented boom in services and subscriptions based on mobile apps such as Streaming Video on Demand (SVOD), music, games, and eCommerce, with the study finding the Internet became “the main source of entertainment” for more than half (52%) of Australians for the first time in 2019.

Additionally, the fast adoption of smart speakers and smartwatches is driving new customer engagements which are becoming important for businesses looking to target early adoptions.

And this year’s study found Australian household had an average of 18.9 connected devices at the end of 2019, an increase from 17.0 in 2018.

Telsyte forecasts this to be greater than 30 devices by 2022 with growth being driven by Australians adopting energy and lighting smart devices, security devices such as cameras and other smart appliances such as smart speakers.

The study found the latest premium digital device adoption is being impacted by price rises, which Telsyte says “is not being helped by the increasing cost of living in Australia”.

“Longer product replacement cycles and rising prices are starting to dictate market trends with consumers looking for new features that justify the increases in costs,” says managing director Foad Fadaghi.

The research also found that Australians cybersecurity concerns are growing due to the rapid adoption of connected technologies and the shift to digital lifestyles, according to the study - with more than 1 in 4 Australians experiencing some form of cybercrime in 2019, including account hacks, phishing, ransomware, identity theft and cyberbullying.

And the findings showed there are also growing concerns amongst parents over the online privacy and safety of children, according to the research, while parents are also less confident they have the knowledge to help their children to navigate safely online.

The Telsyte study also reports a number of other issues raised by repondents incuding that:

Trust in media and government declining

Growing uncertainties are taking its toll on consumer trust, which in Australian society seems to be impacting attitudes toward media and government.

Nearly half (45%) of Australians agree to the statement "I trust less in the Australian government this year than previously".

The study covers awareness, adoption and attitudes toward various digital government services and initiatives across local, state and federal governments, such as digital driver licenses, myGovID and My Health Record.

Australians trust in the media has also been shaken, with 1 in 3 “very concerned” about “fake news”.

Social media influence becoming more pervasive

Social media has proven effective in influencing various aspects of Australians’ lifestyles and attitudes and some 22 per cent of Australian 16 years and older claiming they have purchased something in 2019 as a result of being influenced by a social media post or advertisement.

Nearly half (46%) have read politics related news on social media in 2019, and 21 per cent have posted about politics on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

Changing buyer behaviour

The study found new models in eCommerce are shaping buyer behaviour with the adoption of ‘Buy Now, Pay Later’ (BNPL) services reaching new highs in 2019.

Nearly a quarter of adults in Australia have made purchases using BNPL in 2019, and the research found a list of product categories that favoured BNPL services. These include BNPL opportunities for smaller everyday items such as groceries and petrol.

The push towards subscription services amongst online marketplaces such as eBay and Amazon had some success in 2019, driving online search and purchases. Australians are also showing they are receptive to emerging in-store shopping transformations such as Woolworths Scan & Go.

Gig economy incomes under pressure

As the cost of living increases and slow wage growth impacts household budgets, many are turning to technology-based ways to boost incomes.

The study found the number of gig-economy services (e.g. Uber) users and gig-workers both grew in 2019; however, the average income from gig-economy work decreased year-on-year as more individuals took on “gigs” to supplement their primary income.
Smartphones dominate he ‘digital experience’ research reveals

Australian consumers have traditionally been early adopters of new technologies and at the end of 2019 several key milestones were reached, according to research firm Telsyte which reveals that smartphones have now become the main digital device for more than half (51%) of Australians - with millions of Australians loyal to either their iPhones or Android smartphones.

Telsye says this is driving an unprecedented boom in services and subscriptions based on mobile apps such as Streaming Video on Demand (SVOD), music, games, and eCommerce, with the study finding the Internet became “the main source of entertainment” for more than half (52%) of Australians for the first time in 2019.

Additionally, the fast adoption of smart speakers and smartwatches is driving new customer engagements which are becoming important for businesses looking to target early adoptions.

And this year’s study found Australian household had an average of 18.9 connected devices at the end of 2019, an increase from 17.0 in 2018.

Telsyte forecasts this to be greater than 30 devices by 2022 with growth being driven by Australians adopting energy and lighting smart devices, security devices such as cameras and other smart appliances such as smart speakers.

The study also found the latest premium digital device adoption is being impacted by price rises, which Telsyte says “is not being helped by the increasing cost of living in Australia”.

“Longer product replacement cycles and rising prices are starting to dictate market trends with consumers looking for new features that justify the increases in costs,” says managing director Foad Fadaghi.

The research also found that Australians cybersecurity concerns are growing due to the rapid adoption of connected technologies and the shift to digital lifestyles, according to the study - with more than 1 in 4 Australians experiencing some form of cybercrime in 2019, including account hacks, phishing, ransomware, identity theft and cyberbullying.

The study also found There are also growing concerns amongst parents over the online privacy and safety of children, according to the research, while parents are also less confident they have the knowledge to help their children to navigate safely online.

The Telsyte study also reports a number of other issues raised by repondens incuding that:

Trust in media and government declining

Growing uncertainties are taking its toll on consumer trust, which in Australian society seems to be impacting attitudes toward media and government.

Nearly half (45%) of Australians agree to the statement "I trust less in the Australian government this year than previously".

The study covers awareness, adoption and attitudes toward various digital government services and initiatives across local, state and federal governments, such as digital driver licenses, myGovID and My Health Record.

Australians trust in the media has also been shaken, with 1 in 3 “very concerned” about “fake news”.

Social media influence becoming more pervasive

Social media has proven effective in influencing various aspects of Australians’ lifestyles and attitudes and some 22 per cent of Australian 16 years and older claiming they have purchased something in 2019 as a result of being influenced by a social media post or advertisement.

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

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