The British Government announced a little while ago that it would stop using gear from the Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies in the country/s 5G networks. and would remove all existing gear by the end of 2027.

Former Independent senator Nick Xenophon has accused both Swedish telecommunications company Ericsson and local telco Telstra of "engaging in Olympic class word games" to avoid an inconvenient truth: their 5G equipment is being manufactured in China with a joint-venture partner cited by the US as being under the thumb of the People's Liberation Army.

The chief executive of BT has told the BBC Radio 4's Today program that it would be impossible to remove equipment made by Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies from UK networks for at least seven years.

Former Independent senator Nick Xenophon has put the cat among the pigeons, pointing out that while Chinese vendor Huawei has been banned from supplying gear to the 5G networks, Telstra, which gets its 5G gear from a joint-venture arrangement between Ericsson and Panda Electronics, faces no such strictures.

India's ban on 59 Chinese apps and Delhi's hint that Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies would be excluded from 5G trials following border clashes between soldiers from the two countries could prove to be short-sighted in view of the way Chinese technology dominates the Indian market, an analyst firm says.

The management of Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies have requested a meeting with an aide to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson as news emerges that the company's gear will be removed from the UK's 5G networks by the end of 2025.

The British Government will reportedly set a deadline of 2025 for the removal of gear made by Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies from its 5G networks, a newspaper claims as reported by Reuters.

Electronics retailer Get Gizmo will offer to refund approximately 4,000 customers who were charged for unsolicited purchases before the 10 day cooling off period ended, under a court-enforceable undertaking given to the ACCC, by its sole director, Himanshu Bist.

The Independent National Security Legislation Monitor, Dr James Renwick, says in a 316-page review handed down on 30 June that, with a couple of exceptions, the encryption law, known as the Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018, passed by Australia in December 2018, is necessary.

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