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Displaying items by tag: Whistleblower

Eight groups in Australia are on a list of more than 4000 individuals and groups that Facebook users are barred from speaking about. The social media behemoth maintains that these people and groups promote violence.

Published in Technology Regulation

Hardware authentication security key provider Yubico today announced the general availability of its next-generation FIPS security keys, the YubiKey 5 FIPS series. This is the industry’s first set of multi-protocol security keys with FIDO2 and WebAuthn support to receive FIPS 140-2 validation.

Published in Security

The US Government has filed a case against whistleblower Edward Snowden for publishing a book without first submitting it to the CIA and NSA for approval as required by non-disclosure agreements he signed with the two agencies while employed by them.

Published in Government Tech Policy

London's Metropolitan Police has shared information about a number of journalists, working for whistleblower website WikiLeaks, with prosecutors in the US for at least four years.

Published in Strategy

Individuals who disclose information about any of the three classes of notice to technology or Internet companies, seeking co-operation over an investigation, can be jailed for five years, under a new draft law unveiled on Tuesday.

Published in Government Tech Policy

New Zealand’s competition enforcement agency, The Commerce Commission, has launched an anonymous whistleblowing tool designed to enable people to report cartels without being identified.

Published in Technology Regulation

Whistleblower Edward Snowden’s Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena has recently expressed his and his client’s desire for clemency to be granted by President Donald Trump.

Published in Security

An inside whistle blower dobbed his Western Australian employer into the Business Software Alliance for using unlicensed software – piracy.

Published in Security
If someone spots a potentially costly security hole in your product would you say thanks and fix it, or send in the lawyers? Microsoft opted for the latter, and it was absolutely wrong on this occasion to do so.

Published in Home Tech

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