Home Deals Buddy Platform, T-Mobile seal global connectivity deal
Buddy Ohm driving T-Mobile connectivity Buddy Ohm driving T-Mobile connectivity Featured

Australian-listed Internet of Things data management company Buddy Platform has inked an agreement with US mobile operator T-Mobile for the provision of worldwide data connectivity for the Buddy Ohm platform.

Buddy (ASX:BUD) chief executive David McLauchlan says the agreement provides “highly competitive fixed pricing” in both domestic US markets as well  as via aggregated roaming agreements in more than 140 countries worldwide, all from a common SIM card and data plan management platform.

He says reaching the agreement enables Buddy to sell the Buddy Ohm product — described as a low-cost solution for facility resource monitoring and verification — on a fixed price-based model globally, configured with a single SIM card provisioned at the point of assembly.

“T-Mobile bills themselves as ‘ America’s Un-carrier’, a mobile operator that isn’t afraid to push the envelope and deliver outstanding wireless experiences to their customers. We’re thrilled to be working with such a market leader to provide Buddy Ohm with data connectivity, and we’re particularly pleased to be able to deliver a seamless ‘it just works’ experience nearly everywhere.

“Our customers will be able to unbox their Buddy Ohm units and have them automatically connect to their local mobile network in nearly every country in the world. That’s an incredible out-of-box experience that we can now deliver.”

McLauchlan says Buddy Ohm is currently sold through three channels – direct, through mobile operators (such as Digicel and SaskTel) and through channel partners (such as utilities, energy consultants and electrical installers).

He says the agreement provides centralised, T-Mobile-sourced connectivity for direct and channel sales, while still allowing mobile operator partners to connect the devices over their own networks and data plans.

According to McLauchlan, Wednesday’s announcement takes the company a very considerable step toward a US-wide rollout, “while providing an accelerant for regional US channel partners to deploy Buddy Ohm in local markets”.

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

 

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