Featured IT News

Some Optus services on the blink, US-based sites hit

22 May 2019 in Telecoms & NBN

Australia's second biggest telco, Singtel Optus, has been hit by an outage that has been affecting some services for at…

auDA seeks to end Comms Dept oversight of board meetings

22 May 2019 in Strategy

The au Domain Administration, the organisation that administers the Australian domain namespace, has written to the Department of Communications, seeking…

US slows approval for Chinese workers in chip industry: report

22 May 2019 in Government Tech Policy

Government approvals for American semiconductor firms to hire Chinese citizens for advanced engineering jobs have been slowed down, a report says,…

Windows ban? Huawei laptops disappear from Microsoft Store

22 May 2019 in Government Tech Policy

Huawei laptops running Windows appear to have disappeared from the Microsoft Store online, following the decision by the US Commerce…

TechnologyOne ‘on track’ to deliver full-year record profits and revenue

21 May 2019 in Listed Tech

Enterprise software company TechnologyOne has reported continuing strong growth of its business, with net profit before tax for the half…

Three-fifths of NBN users now on higher speed plans: ACCC

21 May 2019 in Telecoms & NBN

Nearly 60% of the 5.2 million Australian households connected to the NBN at the end of March are on plans…

US eases some restrictions on Huawei for maintenance, updates

21 May 2019 in Government Tech Policy

The US Commerce Department has eased some of the restrictions it imposed on Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies last…

Westpac out in the cold as Apple Pay arrives for NAB customers

21 May 2019 in Strategy

Westpac is the last remaining big Australian banking institution not to offer Apple Pay, after another holdout, NAB, announced that…

NZ businesses have less than 2 years before digital disruption hits: report

20 May 2019 in Market

New Zealand businesses have less than two years to go digital before disruption hits, according to newly released research undertaken by…

Huawei promises continued security updates and service to existing users post Google ban

20 May 2019 in Development

Google has shocked the world by banning Huawei from future OS versions and security updates, but existing Huawei handsets will…

AIIA urges govt to pass encryption law amendments in first 100 days

20 May 2019 in Government Tech Policy

The head of the Australian Information Industry Association, Ron Gauci, has sought an assurance from the re-elected Coalition Government that…

Amazon leads US$575m Deliveroo financing round

20 May 2019 in Strategy

Online giant Amazon is leading a new US$575 million Series G preferred shared funding round in food delivery service Deliveroo,…

Breaking IT News

VIDEO: Asus launches new ROG and TUF gaming notebooks with powerful features and great prices

22 May 2019 in Home Tech

At IEM 2019 earlier this month, and then at its own media event, Asus launched a fantastic range of new…

Veeam Availability Orchestrator v2 expands DR capabilities

22 May 2019 in Data

Veeam Availability Orchestrator v2 brings orchestration and automation capabilities to a broader set of applications and VMs.

Veeam joins billion dollar club

22 May 2019 in Strategy

Data management vendor Veeam passed US$1 billion in annual bookings on 15 May, its co-founder and executive vice president of…

Telstra launches Australia's first 5G mobile hotspot, also supports 4G but no 3G

22 May 2019 in Telecoms & NBN

The HTC 5G Hub can be ordered today, delivering 5G speeds in active areas, and working as a 4GX modem…

ACS appoints Cheryl Mack as NSW state manager

22 May 2019 in People Moves

The Australian Computer Society (ACS) has appointed former StartCon chief executive Cheryl Mack as its NSW state manager.

Samsung to deliver Galaxy S10 5G, its first 5G device, from May 28

22 May 2019 in Telecoms & NBN

Set to be available via Telstra and Samsung's own Experience Stores from May 28, and a free upgrade for select…

Optus lures travellers with roaming add-ons

22 May 2019 in Telecoms & NBN

Optus has launched a new suite of international usage and roaming add-ons on selected prepaid plans targeting travellers.

ABS looks abroad for Census work. Locals ain't good enough

22 May 2019 in Open Sauce

One can't exactly put a name to it, but something akin to cultural cringe must have led the Australian Bureau…

Freshworks acquires Natero, adds 'customer success' platform to portfolio

22 May 2019 in Strategy

Cloud-based business software vendor Freshworks has acquired Natero, a customer success management software company.

Curiious raises $2 million to fuel global growth

22 May 2019 in Strategy

Sydney-based communication company Curiious has closed a $2 million capital raising as it looks to scale up the global expansion…

Huawei to unveil own OS within a year: report

22 May 2019 in Business Software

Chinese telecommunications equipment vendor Huawei Technologies will unveil its own operating systems for both mobile devices and PCs by September,…

Optus switches on new mobile tower in Taree

22 May 2019 in Mobility

Australia's second biggest telco, Singtel Optus, has switched on a new mobile tower in Taree which, it says, will improve…

Indian outsourcer HCL leaks personal, business data on Web

22 May 2019 in Security

Indian outsourcing company HCL Technologies — formerly known as Hindustan Computers Limited — has exposed personal information of employees, plaintext…

Secondary storage solutions targeted by 'with Veeam' program

22 May 2019 in Data

Data management specialist Veeam Software has announced a new program allowing enterprise storage vendors to build comprehensive secondary storage solutions…

Anemones putting up a fight against coral reef bleaching

22 May 2019 in Climate

Sea anemones appear to have a secret weapon that protects them against high temperatures and bleaching that is affecting coral…

Govt contractor charged for using office gear to mine cryptocurrency

22 May 2019 in Technology Regulation

A 33-year-old Federal Government IT contractor has been charged over using his office computer systems to mine cryptocurrency, the Australian…

AUDIO Interview: Zebra celebrates 50 years, launches new hardware that empowers Industry 4.0

22 May 2019 in Development

Proudly celebrating 50 years of "innovating at the edge", two top Zebra executives talk to iTWire about the last five…

NAB finally delivers Apple Pay to its customers

21 May 2019 in Home Tech

Apple Pay is finally available via the National Australia Bank, with NAB nabbing Apple Pay at long last after a…

 

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Sunday, 07 April 2019 19:36

Microsoft SQL Server 2019 set to ease ETL pains with data virtualisation Featured

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Global software house Microsoft is making big data the focus of SQL Server 2019, set for release later this year. A key part is data virtualisation, eliminating complex ETL processes. 

Microsoft says its flagship database product, SQL Server 2019, will make it a lot easier to manage a big data environment. In fact, the product supports a rich variety of environments like Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), Spark, analytics tools, and even Kubernetes-managed Linux containers.

Previously, Microsoft allowed T-SQL queries inside SQL Server 2016 to pull data from Hadoop and return it in a structured way without moving or copying the data. In the 2019 release, this concept of data virtualisation is widely expanded to data sources including Oracle, MongoDB, even CSV files.

Data virtualisation means database administrators can virtualise external data in a SQL Server instance, regardless of source, location, and format, so it can be queried like any other set of tables within your SQL Server instance.

Data virtualisation helps you create a single “virtual” layer of data from these disparate sources providing unified data services to support multiple applications and users.

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This sounds like a data lake, but unlike a typical data lake there is no need to move data from where it lives when using data virtualisation, and this is a huge advantage over traditional ETL (extract, transform, load) processes that by necessity require delays, extra storage, additional security, and an amount of engineering to setup and maintain.

For database administrators, software developers, data scientists and others this new capability is transformative and powerful in its simplicity.

Quite literally, Microsoft has enabled your SQL Server 2019 databases to hold virtual tables which come from some other place on the Internet - whether it is a SQL Server database or otherwise, whether it’s local or far - and query and join and work with these tables just as if they were native to your database. All complex ETL processes are gone.

In this writer’s own experience, there are numerous situations where this delivers tremendous time and functionality savings.

For instance, you make a dashboard showing your company’s revenues by period, office and client out of your main line-of-business app’s database. Management then asks for budgeted sales figures to be included so the dashboards contrast actuals against the budget. However, these aren’t included in your main app but instead held in an Excel spreadsheet. Traditionally, the solution is to manually or periodically upload the spreadsheet into a new table created for this purpose, which your dashboard then queries against.

Or, if you’re using SQL Server 2019, you merely save the budget figures as a CSV file on the Finance team’s file share and add this as a virtual table in your app’s database. The budget figures appear, and can be queried against, and reported on as if they were always in the database.

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Another case: the company needs sales figures to move from its main application into the back-office ERP platform. Typically, this is achieved by exporting and importing the data between the disparate products.

Or, if you’re using SQL Server 2019 you include relevant tables from the ERP system as virtual tables in the main application’s database, and directly move data via a scheduled stored procedure. The ERP doesn’t even have to be an SQL Server database, so long as it is accessible.

SQL Server 2019’s data virtualisation supports Cosmos DB, SQL Server, Azure SQL, Oracle, HDFS and DB2.

Other SQL Server 2019 features include

  • transformational insights over structured and unstructured data supporting Hadoop and Spark;
  • scalable compute and storage clusters;
  • a complete AI platform to train and operationalise R and Python models in SQL Server Machine Learning Services or Spark ML using Azure Data Studio notebooks;
  • the choice of programming language and platforms like .NET, PHP, Node.JS, Java, Python, Ruby and more, and deploy the application on Windows, Linux or containers both on-premise and in the cloud;
  • real-time analytics on operational data using Hybrid Transactional and Analytical Processing; and
  • intelligent query processing features that improve scaling of queries- security enhancements including Always Encrypted secure enclaves, and Data Discovery and Classification labelling for GDPR.

SQL Server 2019 is in a community tech preview stage, and the final release is anticipated in the second half of 2019. Interested parties can sign up for early adoption now

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David M Williams

David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. David subsequently worked as a UNIX Systems Manager, Asia-Pacific technical specialist for an international software company, Business Analyst, IT Manager, and other roles. David has been the Chief Information Officer for national public companies since 2007, delivering IT knowledge and business acumen, seeking to transform the industries within which he works. David is also involved in the user group community, the Australian Computer Society technical advisory boards, and education.