Home Data Black Dog Institute, LifeSpan literally saving lives through data analytics

The non-profit mental health research facility, Black Dog Institute, is applying data analytics to identify strategies that will reduce suicide within the community under its LifeSpan program of work.

LifeSpan is a large program looking at nine different strategies, screening people in general practice, and a range of different interventions across community and health care settings. In order to help evaluate how effective a strategy may be, the program has four sites in NSW and one in the ACT looking to implement the set of strategies in an incremental way to see if what they are doing in these regions is making a difference in suicide rates and hospitalisation.

To achieve its goals, the LifeSpan program needed a good, usable set of data on suicide and hospitalisation. This was obtained through a large range of data custodians, via numerous ethics committees, and the Black Dog Institute researchers gained assistance from global analytics provider, SAS, to help organise the data and work with it, as part of SAS’ Data 4 Good offering.

The SAS involvement began in December 2016 and included a six-month engagement with a resident. SAS came to the Black Dog Institute site and set up platforms for data ingestion, cleaning and processes. The relationship with SAS continues in a consulting capacity.

The main study would be completed in 2021, explained Professor Helen Christensen, director and chief scientist.

The effect of suicide on the community cannot be underestimated. In 2015 the Black Dog Institute said there were 2800 suicides in Australia. In 2017, this increased to 3028 and intentional self-harm is now ranked the 13th leading cause of death, up from 15th place previously.

LifeSpan data manager Matthew Phillips explained the Black Dog Institute was analysing the data to identify trends and high-risk groups, to inform local strategies, and to work with its site’s co-ordinators.

These trends are not simple; “You can have a high socio-economic area with high suicide rates and low socioeconomic areas with low suicide rates – it’s not an even distribution. You could have four to five times more in one local health area than another. It’s not linked to anything in particular; that linkage may differ depending on the region,” he said.

While identifying specific causes remains elusive, the data shows a new disturbing trend has emerged. Suicide rates for men continue to exceed those of women, but an increase in suicide is being seen in young girls aged 12 to 16, which did not exist previously and is alarming many organisations.

Positively, LifeSpan’s research is enabling multiple strategies to address the problems, including Youth Aware mental health, which can be integrated into any school event. A total of 6700 students have run through this to date, with SAS’ capabilities used to capture data like the number of students, dropout rates, engagement and involvement and more, including student’s views prior to the program and afterwards, to see how these have changed.

Another program is titled QPR, for Question, Persuade, Refer. This is an online course that outlines three simple steps which could save the life of a suicidal person. It can be learned by anyone in one hour, and so far 5,000 people have run through it, reporting a 96% increase in supporting a suicidal person. This course can be taken by you.

Another program is a community survey to change the stigma around suicide ideation and health-seeking behaviours, assessing how responses change over the period of LifeSpan’s work, with 8500 responses.

LifeSpan further provides courses for GPs and psychiatrists, with over 400 attendees over the trial sites in Newcastle, the Illawarra, Shoalhaven, the Central Coast and Murrumbidgee.

“Everything we do has to be approved by ethics and different approval for each site. We're trying to put in place an evidence-based approach that's really going to help save lives,” said Christensen.

FREE SEMINAR

Site24x7 Seminars

Deliver Better User Experience in Today's Era of Digital Transformation

Some IT problems are better solved from the cloud

Join us as we discuss how DevOps in combination with AIOps can assure a seamless user experience, and assist you in monitoring all your individual IT components—including your websites, services, network infrastructure, and private or public clouds—from a single, cloud-based dashboard.

Sydney 7th May 2019

Melbourne 09 May 2019

Don’t miss out! Register Today!

REGISTER HERE!

LEARN HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF A CYBER ATTACK

Australia is a cyber espionage hot spot.

As we automate, script and move to the cloud, more and more businesses are reliant on infrastructure that has the high potential to be exposed to risk.

It only takes one awry email to expose an accounts’ payable process, and for cyber attackers to cost a business thousands of dollars.

In the free white paper ‘6 Steps to Improve your Business Cyber Security’ you’ll learn some simple steps you should be taking to prevent devastating and malicious cyber attacks from destroying your business.

Cyber security can no longer be ignored, in this white paper you’ll learn:

· How does business security get breached?
· What can it cost to get it wrong?
· 6 actionable tips

DOWNLOAD NOW!

David M Williams

David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. David subsequently worked as a UNIX Systems Manager, Asia-Pacific technical specialist for an international software company, Business Analyst, IT Manager, and other roles. David has been the Chief Information Officer for national public companies since 2007, delivering IT knowledge and business acumen, seeking to transform the industries within which he works. David is also involved in the user group community, the Australian Computer Society technical advisory boards, and education.

 

Popular News

 

Telecommunications

 

Guest Opinion

 

Sponsored News

 

 

 

 

Connect